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Vienna Metro > Lines > U3

Line U3 Ottakring - Simmering

Line U3

Length: 8.4 miles, travel time: 25 mins.
21 stations, of which 4 are interchange stations with the S-Bahn and 4 with other metro lines
All of the line except the stations at Erdberg and Ottakring is in tunnel.

Construction started in 1983, first section opened in 1991, completed in late 2000.

Standard platform length: 115 m.
Rolling stock used: U and U11

Intervals: 5 mins; peak hours 3 mins; evenings 7-8 mins.

Timetable

first train intervals last train
Ottakring
Westbahnhof
Volkstheater
Stephansplatz
Landstraße
Erdberg
Simmering
|
|
|
|
|
5:08*
5:13*
4:54
5:00
5:04
5:07
5:09
5:14
5:19
3 - 8
mins
0:22
0:28
0:32
0:35
0:37
=:42
0:47
Simmering
Erdberg
Landstraße
Stephansplatz
Volkstheater
Westbahnhof
Ottakring
4:50
4:55
5:00
5:02
5:05
5:09
5:15
3 - 8
mins
0:23
0:28
0:33
0:35
0:38
0:42
0:48
*) Mon-Fri only

Opening dates:

1991-04-06: Erdberg - Volkstheater
1993-09-04: Volkstheater - Westbahnhof
1994-09-03: Westbahnhof - Johnstraße
1998-12-05: Johnstraße - Ottakring
2000-12-02: Erdberg - Simmering

The Stations:

Ottakring: ("Otaccher's village") - Station opened in 1998. Ottakring is the name of Vienna's 16th district. Apparently the land here was owned by a Count Otaccher in the 12th century.

Kendlerstrassee: Station opened in 1998. Street named after Karl Edler von Kendler, who owned a palace in the nearby village of Breitensee.

Hütteldorfer Strasse: ("the road to Hütteldorf") - Station opened in 1998.

Johnstrasse: Station opened in 1994. Street named after the general Franz Xaver Freiherr von John (1815-1876).

Schweglerstrasse: Station opened in 1994. Street named after Johann Schwegler, Mayor of Rudolfsheim between 1870 and 1878.

Westbahnhof: Station opened in 1993. Mail railway station for trains to Western Austria, Germany, Switzerland and Hungary.

Zieglergasse: ("Brick Lane") - Station opened in 1993.

Neubaugasse: Station opened in 1993. Street named after the 7th district (Neubau - "newly built village").

Volkstheater: ("People's Theatre") - Station opened in 1991.
Sights: Museum of Natural History, Museum of Fine Arts, Museum of Modern Art, Kunsthalle Wien, Leopold Museum, Children's Museum, House of Parliament, Imperial Palace (Hofburg), Spittelberg.

Herrengasse: ("Lords' Lane") - Station opened in 1991.
Sights: Minoritenplatz, Michaelerplatz, Imperial Palace, Spanish Riding School.

Stephansplatz: ("St Stephen's Square") - Station opened in 1991. Square in the Vienna city centre, named after St Stephen's Cathedral, which is situated here.
Sights: St Stephen's Cathedral, Graben, and countless others.

Stubentor: ("Stuben Gate") - Station opened in 1991. Named after the city gate situated here until 1858. Some relics of this gate can be seen in the metro station.
Sights: Museum of Applied Arts (MAK), Old University.

Landstrasse: - Station opened in 1991. The name of Vienna's 3rd district ("village on the country road"). Wien Mitte railway station is also located here.

Rochusgasse: ("St Rochus Lane") - Station opened in 1991. Street named after the Church of St Rochus and St Sebastian, which was built here in 1642.

Kardinal-Nagl-Platz: Station opened in 1991. Square named after Cardinal Franz Nagl (1855-1913).

Schlachthausgasse: ("Slaughterhouse Lane") - Station opened in 1991. Street named after the municipal slaughterhouse, built here between 1846 and 1848.

Erdberg: Station opened in 1991. Misleadingly named after the former village Erdberg (now a part of Vienna's 3rd district), whose center isn't really here at all, but rather in the vicinity of Kardinal-Nagl-Platz.

Gasometer: Station opened in 2000. Named after the huge gas tanks of the old gas works, a masterpiece of 19th century industrial architecture.

Zippererstrasse: Station opened in 2000. Street named after Georg Zipperer, who owned some land here in the 1850s.

Enkplatz: Station opened in 2000. Square named after the writer and Benedictine monk Michael Leopold Enk von der Burg (1788-1843).

Simmering: Station opened in 2000. The name of Vienna's 11th district. Not quite as funny in German as it is in English. This has nothing to do with heat, it rather derives from "Simoning" ("Simon's village").

Source for information on street names: Simbrunner, Peter: Wien: Strassennamen von A bis Z (Wien: Ueberreuter, 1989).